General Questions

The title of examination and approval project: the confirmation letter and invitation of retaining economic foreign expert(category: examination and approval)

Examination and approval project number:BJXSAWS007-2002 (Beijing trade examination, category A: foreign affairs, 007-2 sub - item, 2002)

The relevant criteria of examination and approval Item:the Announcement about Application and Management for Confirmation of Retaining Foreign Expert issued by State Foreign Expert Bureau and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs(No. 16 document issued by Foreign Expert office [1996])

The fee of examination and approval Item: no charge
The time limit of examination and approval procedure:7 working day
Examination and Approval Procedure:

The title of examination and approval item:foreign expert certificate (examine and approval category)
The number of examination and approval item:BJXSCWS003-2002

the regulations on examination and approval Item: Notice about application of foreign expert certificate issued by State Foreign Expert Bureau.
The fee of examination and approval Item: no charge
Examine and approve overall timing:7 days
Examination and approval Procedure:

Notice About Administration of Foreign Expert Certificate Issued by State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs (SAFEA).State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs of Provincial and autonomous regional governments, municipality directly under the central authority, education committee, talents importing office, general office(Bureau)of public security, ministries and commissions of the State Council, education departments and foreign affairs departments of Institutions directly under State Council:

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With a legal job you can usually obtain a resident's visa for your children, though again you may have difficulty in supporting them on a teacher's income. There would also be the question of their education, which in some cases would prove exorbitantly expensive.

Native English speakers are preferred but not required as long as you have a good command of the English language and do not have much of a foreign accent. There are many teachers in China who were not born in but educated in English speaking countries with not much of a foreign accent. There are many ESL/EFL teachers in China who did not educate in English speaking countries but have taught very well.

With a legal job you can usually obtain a resident's visa for your children, though again you may have difficulty in supporting them on a teacher's income. There would also be the question of their education, which in some cases would prove exorbitantly expensive.

Yes, many schools in China offer Chinese language courses for foreigners, in which you can take at your spare time. Some schools may offer you free lessons or tutoring services at a discounted price. You can also find a private tutor or share one with other foreign teachers. Private tutor may ask for between RMB 30-40 an hour. We find the best way to learn Mandarin and the Chinese culture is to find a local Chinese student or teacher as a language exchange partner. Many Chinese students and teachers are eager to teach you Mandarin in exchange for your help in English.

Yes, indeed you are higher paid than many local workers and teachers in China. Normal wages in Beijing and Shanghai (the richest cities) are between RMB 1500-2000, and less in rural/inner China. Since you do not have to pay for accommodation, your main expenses will be on food (some schools also provide free meals to teachers), transportation, and entertainment. Food is generally cheap in China. Single dish meals at the cafeteria on campus cost as little as RMB 4 (USD 0.50). Chinese restaurants on campus in the school area offer meals for RMB 10-20 (USD 1.25-3) per person per day. Western restaurants cost between RMB 50-100 (USD 6-12) per person per meal. Transportation options include public buses (which cost about RMB 1 per ride) and subway (RMB 2-3 per ride), and taxi costs about RMB 10 (USD 1.25) for short distances. Internet Cafe is very cheap for about RMB 4-6 (USD 0.5-0.75) an hour. Entertainment in general is also inexpensive.

It is an excellent way to learn about the Chinese culture, customs, and behavior. You can teach English to the Chinese and share your culture with them, but also can learn Mandarin Chinese from them. Besides, you will make many friends with both the locals and other foreign teachers and build useful network. It is especially helpful if you want to pursue an international career in the future, as China is a rapidly developing country and is playing a bigger role in the world economy and politics. Besides, you will be offered free accommodation, a salary, and in some cases, free meals, airfare reimbursement, and free excursions!

Teaching time in China varies from school to school, but often is between 12 and 19 hours a week.

There are many mountains at 2,000 meters above sea level around Beijing; so hiking is one of the favorites of outdoor sports lovers. Also available are rock climbing, ice climbing, and hang gliding.

This depends on what vaccinations you already have and what country you are coming from. We suggest that you consult a travel doctor from your country before you arrive. (NOTE: Check early because some vaccinations may require as much as two months before arrival to China).

Given the vastness of China, its seasons and climates vary depending on when and where you visit. The months of April and October are usually good times to visit. China is uniformly warmed, humid, and rainy in the summer. In contrast, winter weather can vary considerably from city to city. Beijing, for example is very cold in the winter, with afternoon highs averaging only 34 degrees F. The best times to visit Beijing are in the early fall and late spring, especially May and September, with April and October almost as pleasant. Humidity, however, can be high from June to September.

What is Chinese laws on drugs, alcohol and prescription medicine? As stated, foreign teachers should bring in their own prescription drugs sufficient for the entire stay. Western medications are not readily available in China beyond commonly used drugs, and those are available through major hospitals in major cities. Foreigners are often surprised to find that some drugs that would be prescription in their own country are readily available over the counter in China.

Alcohol is readily available in China. Beer is a common beverage and most regions have their own specialty beer. Also available is "bai jiu," a particularly potent drink made from rice or sorghum. This is often served at banquets and meals. Foreigners should pay attention to how much they are drinking, since the alcohol content is normally higher than western liquors. If a person drinks too much, they can be arrested for being drunk and disorderly. This would mean incarceration for a period of time or a fine.

Normally, a school will outline a position and the conditions of employment. That outline includes name and location of the school, minimum qualification for the teacher (BA, MA), subjects to be taught, numbers of classroom contact hours, monthly salary, any additional benefits, accommodation, medical care particulars, allowable holidays, and other information pertinent to the specific school.

Number of contact hours varies with 16- 20 being the norm. Some institutions require more and salary is normally adjusted to accommodate the extra teaching hours. If asked to teach beyond the contracted number of hours, the teacher is paid at a stated rate per hour, as stipulated by the institution. Numbers of teaching hours are stated in the contract.

Regulations state that foreign teachers can reside in China for only 5 years on teaching contracts before needing to leave China for at least 2 years before returning to teach.

The Chinese government is strict concerning adherence to its laws and regulations. If a foreign teacher breaks Chinese laws, they are subject to Chinese punishment, incarceration, and/or deportation, depending on the infraction. In most cases, embassies are powerless to help the teacher in trouble other than notify family and act as consultant. Breaking Chinese regulations can be as small as not having your Residency Permit in a timely manner (fine is involved) to being involved in a traffic accident where the blame is put on the foreigner. The foreign teachers should realize that any infraction in their own country is probably an infraction in China.

Foreigners should not participate in any political gatherings and should be aware that underground churches are monitored. Participation can be perceived as breaking the law and arrest can follow. Proselytizing is also not allowed, in or out of the classroom.

There are now many law firms in China who have American-trained lawyers on their staffs.

Most diseases in China are treatable. The Chinese health care system is quite sophisticated and widespread. Foreigners need to be aware that HIV/AIDS has become a greater issue and care should be taken in personal hygiene and sexual conduct. SARS is also an issue if it again reoccurs and the foreign teacher should always follow the instructions of the host institution as they try to combat the virus. The Chinese Ministry of Health is now monitoring the new Bird Flu potential spread in Asia. Listen carefully to advice both through your embassy website, China Daily and English CCTV-9 English television (24 hrs a day). This may mean that the foreigner at times feels restricted in movement and ability to perform duties. However, precautions are with good reason and the foreign teacher should try not to question the procedures, but follow instructions in a friendly and cooperative manner.

Malaria is not a true danger. Tuberculosis and hepatitis is found in the rural areas and among migrant workers. The foreign teacher should practice good hygiene, be aware that there are diseases that exist in China that perhaps no longer openly exist elsewhere, and pay attention to where they are and what they are experiencing. Good hygiene is essential and care and thorough washing and preparation of meats and vegetables are highly recommended. Always drink only boiled water!

Yes! The cost of living in China is considerable less than in western countries. Five hundred dollars (4,000 yuan RMB) makes your salary about the average of China’s urban workforce and FAR above the average salaries of most professional employees in smaller cities. Four thousand RMB a month is a GOOD salary in China. Just be frugal, let your Chinese colleagues and friends help you with daily shopping, don’t be extravagant and you will enjoy a comfortable, safe and pleasant life in China. Also – don’t complain – you will be treated like an important friend and a knowledgeable expert and be highly respected. Return the respect to China and your Chinese colleagues, professional associates, friends and students.

A different world, students eager to learn, a group of sincere friends, a country with an ancient civilization dating back to five thousand years ago...

Once be recruited in this project you will enjoy a reasonable income which will guarantee you a completely easy life in China. Most schools offer you totally free accommodations, a safe and scenic environment, compensation for round-trip ticket (for one year contact), insurance and rich opportunities of traveling.

Category Length (yrs) Credential
Kindergarten 3
Elementary 6 Diploma
Junior High 3 Diploma
Senior High 3 Diploma
College 2-3 Diploma
University 4 Bachelor's Degree
Graduate Master 2-3 Master's Degree
Graduate PhD 3-4 PhD Degree

1 Educational Policy
At present, foreign experts working in Guangdong have many choices to give their children a good education. They can individually send their young generation to some international schools and all sorts of other ones that have the qualifications to admit the foreign students. (For more concrete information on admission, please directly contact the school considered.)

This card is needed if you are a foreign teacher in China. Its main use is by you/your school to change part of your salary (up to 70% monthly) into hard currency. This is their verification and your proof that the exchange has taken place. At one time, the card could be used for discount airfares/train fares in China. This was because fares for Chinese and foreigners differed greatly. Fares are now supposed to be equal and the card has no real effect in travel rates. It might help in some hotels.

Public transportation is normally sufficient for a teacher's needs. Many times, a teacher has a bicycle for transportation. Bus systems are normally efficient (although crowded) and all cities have efficient taxi systems.

The Chinese government is strict concerning adherence to its laws and regulations. If a foreign teacher breaks the Chinese laws, they are subject to Chinese punishment, incarceration, and/or deportation, depending on the infraction. In most cases, embassies are powerless to help the teacher in trouble other than notify family and act as consultant. Breaking Chinese regulations can be as small as not having your Residency Permit in a timely manner (fine is involved) to being involved in a traffic accident where the blame is put on the foreigner (large fines, possible incarceration, probably deportation depending on the circumstances). The foreign teachers should realize that any infraction in their own country is probably an infraction in China.

Foreigners should not participate in any political gatherings and should be aware that underground churches are monitored. Participation can be perceived as breaking the law and arrest can follow. Proselytizing is also not allowed, in or out of the classroom.

If a teacher of Chinese background enters China using only an ID card, they are treated as a Chinese citizen in cases of breaking the law. The embassies have no jurisdiction over that person, even if a citizen of another nation.

If there are questions concerning specific regulations, these should be discussed with the school/institution foreign affairs officer.

As stated, foreign teachers should bring in their own prescription drugs sufficient for the entire stay. Western medications are not readily available in China beyond commonly used drugs, and those are available through major hospitals in major cities. Foreigners are often surprised to find that some drugs that would be prescription in their own country are readily available over the counter in China.

Alcohol is readily available in China. Beer is a common beverage and most regions have their own specialty beer. Also available is "bai jiu," a particularly potent drink made from rice or sorghum. This is often served at banquets and meals. Foreigners should pay attention to how much they are drinking, since the alcohol content is normally higher than western liquors. If a person drinks too much, they can be arrested for being drunk and disorderly. This would mean incarceration for a period of time or a fine.

"Z" Working Visa allows a person to reside and work in China on a letter of invitation from a school and province for the duration of the contract plus 30 days of travel following the end of the contract. This has been a standard visa used for foreign teachers and experts. The dates on the visa are only good for entry into China within a 90-day period of time and not beyond. The document that verifies your living and working limits in China is the Residency Permit issued to you by the Public Security Bureau (PSB) governing your school’s location. By government regulation, you must be registered with your local PSB within 30 days of your arrival in China or you will be illegal. If the school does not register you and it is their fault, they are normally heavily fined.

The foreign teachers should bring any long-term medications with them, since many western medicines are not available in China. Supply should be sufficient to cover the length of stay plus one month. A person cannot count on renewing a prescription in China. However, it is a good idea to have a copy of the original prescription with your documents so that in the case of emergency, people will know what medications your are taking for what condition.

It is highly recommended that anyone traveling to China carry their own health insurance from their home nation. In China, insurance cards are not recognized and the person must pay for everything in cash, get receipts, and then take up reimbursement questions with their insurance company.

It is wise to bring an extra pair of glasses and/or contact lenses when coming to China. One should remember that the air quality in China is often poor and this affects those who wear contact lenses. It is recommended that the person also bring the glasses/contact lens prescription and specifications for replacement purposes, if necessary.

A person should never drink tap water in China. Bottled water is readily available. A person should always check to see that the seal on the bottled water is unbroken. At times, an institution will make a water dispenser available in the foreign teacher’s apartment.

Food should be thoroughly cooked. Meats should be cooked through. Be aware that sometimes food purchased on the street, such as roasted meat on a stick, might not be thoroughly cooked. If this is the case and it is eaten, the person will often experience bouts of diarrhea or upset stomach. It is wise to carry chewable Pepto Bismol or some other remedy. The Chinese will often eat a whole clove of raw garlic prior to eating out where they are unsure of the food quality.

If you feel you have food poisoning, you will need to visit a doctor/clinic/hospital for treatment. Inform your host institution and they will help you.

Any fever, diarrhea, or loss of weight over a long period of time needs to be attended to by a physician.

Most diseases in China are treatable. SARS has recently shown that the health care system might need some readjustment. However, the foreigner is treated well if they become ill. The foreign needs to be aware that HIV/AIDS has become a greater issue and care should be taken in personal hygiene and sexual conduct. SARS is also an issue if it again reoccurs and the foreign teacher should always follow the instructions of the host institution as they try to combat the virus. This may mean that the foreigner at times feels restricted in movement and ability to perform duties. However, precautions are with good reason and the foreign teacher should try not to question the procedures, but simply follow instructions.

As mentioned, malaria is not a true danger. Tuberculosis is found in the rural areas and among migrant workers.

The foreign teacher should practice good hygiene, be aware that there are diseases that exist in China that perhaps no longer openly exist elsewhere, and pay attention to where they are and what they are experiencing.

At times, the institution will provide meals or will have teachers eat at the student cafeterias for a minimal price. Many teachers prefer to cook on their own. Normally, the cost of meals is on the teacher.

Most lodging includes a washing machine. Dryers are not a normal appliance in China, with line drying preferred. Dry cleaners are appearing in major cities. Bathrooms are western-style and normally have both tub and shower.

As part of the agreement, institutions provide free accommodation to the foreign teachers. Lodging varies from guesthouse room, similar to a standard hotel, to a complete apartment with sitting room, bedroom, bathroom, and kitchen area. Much depends on the school facilities and what they are able to provide for the teacher. Normally, the teacher receives an apartment setting. At some schools, teachers share a living space but have separate bedrooms. In all cases, there is “private” space for the foreign teacher.

Nothing additional is required, although certificates showing proficiency in teaching, especially English as a foreign language, are highly desired by the host institution and often will lead to a higher salary.

That information is part of the application process and copies of degrees and the schools will request certificates as proof for your China file of your training and background.

In some cases, schools are so anxious to have an English speaker as a teacher that they will overlook items necessary for the teacher’s file. Be aware that a legal school/institution should have on file the teacher’s documentation proving their legality to be a teacher in China. Otherwise, the foreign teacher can be caught earning money illegally.

In many institutions, foreign teachers are expected to keep scheduled office hours. These are woven into the teaching schedule. Further, teachers are often expected to participate in "English Corner," an informal gathering of students – not necessarily the teacher's students – to practice English in an unstructured way. In some institutions, teachers are expected to give a public lecture on some specific subject once or twice a semester. At times, teachers are asked to provide taped voices for exams or editing for materials for Chinese English teachers. Sometimes, teachers are asked to have their photo taken for publicity purposes and this might extend to radio or TV interviews. Some teachers have been invited to participate in movies as extras.

Following are the guides as stated by the Chinese government:

*Category 1: RMB 2,200 – 3,300 – teachers having a bachelor's degree and over two years of work experience, or middle school teachers with over three years of teaching experience.

*Category 2: RMB 3,300 – 4,600 – assistant professors or lecturers of institutions of higher education, or middle school teachers with over five years of teaching experience, and professionals with corresponding titles and business levels.

*Category 3: RMB 4,600 – 6,000 – professors, associate professors of institutions of higher education, senior lecturers of the Commonwealth countries, and professionals with corresponding titles and business levels.

*Crucial talents badly needed in China and difficult to recruit may be employed with high salary.

NOTE: There are the established guidelines and allow room for negotiation. In reality, many schools will offer higher salaries to entice the foreign teacher. However, a higher salary from a school often means more contracted teaching hours or other specified duties.

The academic year in China normally begins on September 1 of each year. In the case of some private schools, the academic year will begin earlier. The length of the first semester varies because the Lunar Calendar governs the year. The long winter break can occur anywhere from mid-January on into mid-February depending on the dates of the Chinese Lunar New Year/Spring Festival. Normally, institutions end their semester 2 weeks prior to Spring Festival eve and resume for the second semester 2 weeks following Spring Festival day. Length of the second semester is adjusted accordingly; most institutions end between July 1 and July 15 with some ending sooner. Note that it is often difficult to learn exact beginning and ending dates to semesters in an academic year. They simply are not public knowledge until the time approaches.

Length of contract depends on the teacher and can be for one semester or for two semesters…or longer. Many schools have summer programs and wish the foreign teacher to stay for those. The norm, however, is for a ten-month contract that is flexible to the dates as described above. Further note that although a contract may state that the teacher will be paid by the month for the contract length, some institutions will pro-rate the salary according to the days taught if the semester ends early. This is a detail that should be clarified prior to signing a contract so there are no surprises.

A ten-month contract will allow for various paid holidays, including October 1-8 (National Day Holiday), May 1-8 (Labor Day Holiday); approximately 4 weeks during the Winter Spring Festival Holiday; approximately 4 weeks during the summer holiday if a teacher is continuing on at a school for the following academic semester/year. Most institutions will pay the salary for the long winter or summer break, although some will pro-rate the salary or not pay for those times. This should be clarified prior to signing any contract. Technically, the foreign teacher should be paid for the contracted dates, including holidays; beginning date to ending date as stated on the contract.

Local leave is normally not granted. Schools/institutions sometimes allow a teacher to travel during the teaching time, but this is highly unusual and the circumstances would need to be extreme. The host institution does not normally tolerate unauthorized absence from duties. Teachers are bound to the teaching schedule and enjoy the same holiday breaks as everyone else.

Normally, the foreign teachers pay for their own baggage above the airline limit. In rare cases where the job involves a foreign expert employed for other purposes on a separate contract, the institution or hiring body would help defray the costs of overweight luggage. If a teacher feels they might be overweight in luggage, or they wish to have certain items, these can be shipped via surface. It takes between 2 and 3 months for surface mail to arrive.

Normally, a school will outline a position and the conditions of employment. That outline includes name and location of the school, minimum qualification for the teacher (BA, MA), subjects to be taught, numbers of classroom contact hours, monthly salary, any additional benefits, accommodation, medical care particulars, allowable holidays, and other information pertinent to the specific school.

Number of contact hours varies with 16- 20 being the norm. Some institutions require more and salary is normally adjusted to accommodate the extra teaching hours. If asked to teach beyond the contracted number of hours, the teacher is paid at a stated rate per hour, as stipulated by the institution. Numbers of teaching hours are stated in the contract.

This varies among the institutions. Many will provide reimbursement for a round-trip international economy air ticket at the completion of one academic year. Others will provide reimbursement for one-half of the international air ticket at the end of one academic year. Some institutions provide one-half of the international air ticket at the completion of one contracted semester. Normally, the terms are written into the contract.Reimbursement is in Chinese Yuan RMB and is not considered as part of the salary for conversion purposes.

Salaries vary from institution to institution and region to region. They also vary among public schools and private schools. Salaries are dependent on the teacher’s education and background experience. The base salary for a foreign teacher in China is 2,200 Yuan RMB. However, most institutions pay much more than that and salaries can range from 3,000 Yuan RMB to as high as 7,000 Yuan RMB, depending on the teacher qualifications and the teaching demands. These are determined by the host institution and can be negotiated by the teacher if there is a question. Any salary earned above 4,000 Yuan RMB is subject to a 10% tax.

Salaries are paid in cash in Chinese Yuan Renminbi (RMB). Normally, salaries are paid by the 5th day of the month and are paid for the month worked. This means that an incoming teacher might not receive their first salary payment until the beginning of the second month of teaching. However, some schools will pay one months ahead as a courtesy, realizing the teacher has nothing for the first month. NOTE: A teacher is allowed to exchange up to 70% of their salary for foreign currency, normally United States Dollars (USD). Current exchange rate is: $1USD = 8.27RMB.

The foreign teachers should bring any long-term medications with them, since many western medicines are not available in China. Supply should be sufficient to cover the length of stay plus one month. A person cannot count on renewing a prescription in China. However, it is a good idea to have a copy of the original prescription with your documents so that in the case of emergency, people will know what medications your are taking for what condition.

It is highly recommended that anyone traveling to China carry their own health insurance from their home nation. In China, insurance cards are not recognized and the person must pay for everything in cash, get receipts, and then take up reimbursement questions with their insurance company.

It is wise to bring an extra pair of glasses and/or contact lenses when coming to China. One should remember that the air quality in China is often poor and this affects those who wear contact lenses. It is recommended that the person also bring the glasses/contact lens prescription and specifications for replacement purposes, if necessary.

Anyone coming to China to teach is required to have a full medical examination in order to meet the guidelines for working in China. This includes test results recorded on an "official" Chinese health form, chest x-ray, ECG, blood tests, Hepatitis and Syphilis test, and HIV/AIDS test. If the medical is done in the home country, all original results must be brought into China and presented to the host institution. These complete your file for the Public Security Bureau, allowing you to receive a Residency Permit. If the medical is not done in the home country, it must be performed in China after arrival at the host institution. Without a medical exam, a person cannot live and work in China. The medical form should be stamped with an official physician, clinic, or hospital stamp.

A teacher should be current with vaccinations and any other injections deemed necessary to international travel as advised by the physician. Unless teaching for a period of time in the extreme southern part of China, people do not need to worry about malaria or other tropical diseases. It is wise to have a vaccination certificate (WHO) listing your inoculations and dates of injections in case they are needed for any reason.

A foreign teacher is allowed up to 30 sick leave days with the verification of a doctor. In some cases, if the illness is lengthy, the teacher receives a pro-rated salary for that time. The institution has the right to terminate employment if a teacher is not able to resume a normal working schedule after 30 days of sick leave. If a teacher is diagnosed with an illness that cannot be cured within a short period of time, arrangements are made to return that teacher to their home nation as soon as possible.

Inquiring Minds Wish to Know – 2003

Institutions provide medical services to the teacher up to approximately 1,000 Yuan RMB ($120 USD) during a contracted period of time. In some cases, an institution will pay only 80% of medical expenses. Medical care is normally sought at the institution’s clinic or designated hospital. If a teacher wishes to go elsewhere, they must bear the medical costs themselves.There are no provisions for maternity pay. The same medical information holds as for illness.

Personal items can be shipped into the country. Depending on the items, there may be a duty/tax assigned through Customs. Because most teachers come into China for a 10-month stay, they do not “import” furniture or items. A person can purchase almost anything in China. If a person purchases an antique or a piece of registered art, they must have a certificate authenticating the piece and the purchase to produce when going through Customs at exit. A person cannot export items for re-sale elsewhere, since that constitutes a business and the person would need to have a business license to do so. Many times, if a purchase is made at an art center, the center will package the item and ship it. This takes care of Customs difficulties. Much depends on the size of the purchase.

Foreign teachers/workers in China are subject to a 10% tax on anything earned above 4,000 Yuan RMB per month. In many cases, the host institution will absorb this cost as a benefit to the teacher. There are no other taxes levied on the foreign teacher.

Anyone coming to China to teach is required to have a full medical examination in order to meet the guidelines for working in China. This includes test results recorded on an "official" Chinese health form, chest x-ray, ECG, blood tests, Hepatitis and Syphilis test, and HIV/AIDS test. If the medical is done in the home country, all original results must be brought into China and presented to the host institution. These complete your file for the Public Security Bureau, allowing you to receive a Residency Permit. If the medical is not done in the home country, it must be performed in China after arrival at the host institution. Without a medical exam, a person cannot live and work in China. The medical form should be stamped with an official physician, clinic, or hospital stamp.

Free accommodation is provided for the foreign teacher. The lodging is ready to be used by the teacher upon arrival. This is a responsibility of the host institution. See previous sections for full details. In some cases, there is service attendant care on a regular basis. In most cases, the teachers care for their own living space. Teachers are not taxed on accommodations. Lodging is the responsibility of the institution.

Teachers will need to provide small items as needed to function in the lodging space. This can include pots and pans, kitchen utensils, or anything the teacher feels is necessary.

Lodging comes furnished with enough furniture to allow for comfortable living.

The cost of living varies according to region and city. It is higher in the major cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Nanjing than in other medium or smaller cities. Normally, what a person earns in salary is sufficient to the needs and cost of living of the area/city. The foreign teacher normally earns a higher salary than their Chinese teaching counterparts. If prudent, teachers can save enough of their salary to travel during the vacation periods.

To live and work in China long-term (up to one year or more), the teacher should enter China on a "Z" work visa. The "Z" visa requires a Letter of Invitation from the host institution stating that you will be working for them and will be their responsibility while in China. "F" visas, with a Letter of Invitation, are acceptable for a one-semester (6-month) stay.

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